Thursday, 23 February 2012

Wisley Cream (but no cream tea)

After a hectic start to the week, (why did my freezer have to break down?), work has finally begun on, 'Wisley Cream'. As the flowers had already been and sadly gone, I decided to tackle the stem and leaves first and do the flowers last of all. A bit back to front as I like to do short-lived flowers such as on this clematis first, but I can always cut another stem for reference.


Oh all right then, maybe I'll do some of the buds too!
An early wash on the leaves, setting out the veins


Once I got going, this latest project has progressed quite well. The stem has this gorgeous reddy-brown colour, which I mixed using my favourite Perylene Maroon and Indanthrene Blue with some Cadmium Red here and there. Such gloriously rich colours which mix to form a fantastic range of shades just perfect for the job. Where the light hits the stem, the colour appears almost blue, a sort of washed out bluey-grey if you get me. It is a lovely effect which I hope to achieve. From the samples I have mixed, Cerulean Blue mixed with a little of the stem colour seemed to be a good match.

The composition with some of the leaves and buds


The flower stems are more acidic yellow than green. Cerulean and Lemon Yellow worked well for a base colour with further washes of the mix with some French Ultramarine pepped things up a bit. On some stems Olive Green with some of the lighter mix was used for the shadows. 

Next up,more of those frothy little leaves!

         

3 comments:

Jessica Rosemary Shepherd said...

this looks like my kind of painting! Beautiful colours and those leaves are really tangible. Fab start, can't wait to see it develop.

Rebecca said...

I especially love the red on the stems...and the composition looks wonderful.

Sketchbook Squirrel said...

Hi Jess, I'm glad you like it. Hope to get this one out of the way quickly as I have loads of ideas buzzing.

Thanks Rebecca, the colour of the stem was what drew me to this plant. The flowers are really pale which might prove tricky, but here goes!